::Click (twice) to enlarge::
It cracks me up when restaurant patrons send PR contacts “long emails” bitching about something that happened at dinner that was their own fault. I’m all for complaining when something legitimately goes wrong that’s outside a person’s control - like, say, receiving food that made them sick, or having a poor experience with a server who was rude for no reason - but when an incident is actually the customer’s fault, and then the customer complains, why should the PR rep care? Because the person is a “paying customer”? Please. 
We’re all so trained to think “the customer is always right,” we often forget that we are slovenly assholes who refuse to accept responsibility for our own actions. And while it’s a publicist’s job to review emails about conduct and “customer suffering,” it is hardly in the rep’s best interest to pay lip service to “long emails” written by conspicuously dramatic mothers who make baby spit threats on the internet. Especially when those threats are in response to something they could have prevented from happening.
I’m not suggesting that kids don’t run loose on occasion. Children are like the human equivalent of that scene in ‘Pretty Woman’ when a snail flies across the room. They’re nearly impossible to control sometimes. But I am saying that once a child sneaks through the rail to the ‘no minors’ area at the Sticky Wicket Pub, regardless of how “disrespectful” a server is, his mother’s response should be, “We’ll make sure he stays in the family dining area, thanks,” and not, “I will hunt you down the next time he is sick and have him sneeze in your mouth.” Assuming, of course, that the server didn’t force the kid to wash dishes or bus tables or sling drinks as punishment. I’m glad that Blondie seems to agree. Is it just me or is she treating Elizabeth like a princess who regularly whines on Facebook while shining her tiara? Sometimes you’ve just gotta choose your battles.
Related: How (Not) To Act In a Restaurant, Screaming Babies In Restaurants, and Restaurant Etiquette Redux
(submitted by Anonymous)

::Click (twice) to enlarge::

It cracks me up when restaurant patrons send PR contacts “long emails” bitching about something that happened at dinner that was their own fault. I’m all for complaining when something legitimately goes wrong that’s outside a person’s control - like, say, receiving food that made them sick, or having a poor experience with a server who was rude for no reason - but when an incident is actually the customer’s fault, and then the customer complains, why should the PR rep care? Because the person is a “paying customer”? Please. 

We’re all so trained to think “the customer is always right,” we often forget that we are slovenly assholes who refuse to accept responsibility for our own actions. And while it’s a publicist’s job to review emails about conduct and “customer suffering,” it is hardly in the rep’s best interest to pay lip service to “long emails” written by conspicuously dramatic mothers who make baby spit threats on the internet. Especially when those threats are in response to something they could have prevented from happening.

I’m not suggesting that kids don’t run loose on occasion. Children are like the human equivalent of that scene in ‘Pretty Woman’ when a snail flies across the room. They’re nearly impossible to control sometimes. But I am saying that once a child sneaks through the rail to the ‘no minors’ area at the Sticky Wicket Pub, regardless of how “disrespectful” a server is, his mother’s response should be, “We’ll make sure he stays in the family dining area, thanks,” and not, “I will hunt you down the next time he is sick and have him sneeze in your mouth.” Assuming, of course, that the server didn’t force the kid to wash dishes or bus tables or sling drinks as punishment. I’m glad that Blondie seems to agree. Is it just me or is she treating Elizabeth like a princess who regularly whines on Facebook while shining her tiara? Sometimes you’ve just gotta choose your battles.

Related: How (Not) To Act In a Restaurant, Screaming Babies In Restaurants, and Restaurant Etiquette Redux

(submitted by Anonymous)

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